I am a 19 year old female who weighs 190. I did lose some weight, as I weighed 210 before. I am 5″2. I know that sounds over weight, cuz it is, but I am not fat. I have a flat stomach, and everything else on me is very skinny! I want to lose more because I am VERY heavy … Barely any fat on me, but I’m a very heavy girl. I don’t want this weight on me anymore, so I was wondering if you could help explain this to me, or give me another diet to lose weight (not fat)?
But I've seen some women beat themselves up over a few extra pounds, even though this does little more than destroy their self-worth. Berating yourself will not help motivate you to control your weight and improve your health. So the next time those negative thoughts creep into your head, recognize them for what they are and replace them with positive ones.
Hello – I found this site this morning as I too am looking to shed a few kilos – 7 in fact – that I feel are making me uncomfortable as my clothes are too tight. I don’t want to buy a bigger size so am opting to lose weight instead. These kilos have piled on due to a change in lifestyle which finds me working from home and not having to go to a work place. I have develop bad habits and reduced the amount of time I stand or walk about a building.
I am mid 40s and already going through perimenopause phase sinc last year. Seems like I gained suddenly body fat even exercise with HIIT, cardio and weight lifting. I eat clean, no sugar, no flour and processed food. I assume it is to do with my hormone change. I have light period and shorter now these days. Still experiencing mood swings, breast tenderness, bloating and weight gain, hungry for sweets and salty before period. I try to find any articles about carb cycling for women who go through perimenopause phase but can’t find them.
About: She had us with her name, but diving a little deeper, Shawn’s creativity really sinks the hooks in. Her “about” section is written like a sad (and playful) fairytale, but it’s her very real struggle that also touches a nerve. Shawn’s always been a hard worker, but her pursuit of education and a career took a toll on her body — causing weight gain and a deep depression. Shawn started Shrederella as a way to take back her life and chronicle the journey, and she’s done one heck of a job. Follow her for an authentic person with real struggles that you will surely relate to — plus a host of delicious, healthy recipes and fitness tricks.
Invest in single-serving containers. The National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases says that a serving size on a food label may be more or less than the amount of food you should eat, depending on your age, height, sex, and weight. Once you're done cooking, place the excess servings in the containers to eat for lunch or dinner tomorrow. That way, you won't polish off everything in one sitting.

Refined white breads are simple carbohydrates that your body processes as sugar, and can really hinder your weight-loss efforts. Whole grain bread, on the other hand, is chock-full of slimming fiber and can help you feel fuller, longer. Just be sure to read your labels. “If the ingredients at the top of the ingredient list read sugar, sucrose, fructose, corn syrup, white or wheat flour, these foods contain mostly simple carbs and should be limited,” Rebecca Lewis, RD, told us. “A food is only considered a whole grain if the first ingredient on the packaging says, ‘whole grain’ or ‘whole wheat.’”
More importantly, though, strength training does wonders for your body. It helps make bones denser, critical because our bones become weaker as we age, increasing the risk of osteoporosis — of the 10 million Americans suffering from the disease, 80 percent are women. (4) Strength training helps build lean muscle tissue, helping you lose more weight all over, including the dreaded belly fat. It also reduces your risk of type 2 diabetes and cardiovascular disease. (5)
Emmie's blog is about her journey to find her “Skinny Emmie,” the person inside her who feels healthy and great and doesn’t let external appearances slow her down. Emmie is open and honest with her readers and engages in conversation with them in the comments section of her blog. You can tell that she really cares about her readers and how her blog affects them.
About: Alycia’s been following blogs for years, but to her, the biggest problem is that many of them don’t start until after the author loses weight and finds success. Alycia’s got a different way of doing things — she is blogging to show her real-time approach for shedding her unwanted pounds, exercising and eating right. She’s putting it all out there and hoping that she can succeed, plus inspire a few people along the way.
ANYWAY, as far as the beginning of college goes, I thought a lot about nutrition and fitness and really wanted them to be incorporated into my life. For exercise, I joined the women’s ultimate frisbee team.  I honestly joined because the team was a built in community of really amazing people who were great friends but even better accountability partners that kept me coming to practice and pushing myself while I was there. We had practice for 2 hours about 3 times a week, and I never exercised outside of those times. On the topic of nutrition, I never thought I ate that bad. However, college dining halls can wreck your body. Unlimited buffets with more unhealthy than healthy options was not in my favor. Of course I ate salads, chicken/fish, and veggies on a regular basis, but I also ate my fair share of french fries, frozen yogurt, cookies, and whatever desserts were available. So many weekly activities and meetings had free food, and late night study snacks were a regular occurrence.

Jillian Michaels is a full-fledged fitness regimen, complete with exercise protocol and meal guides. If you’re motivated to lose weight and get in shape, this may be the program for you. The workouts are broken up into circuits of a few simple exercises, with multiple circuits per day. You’ll also benefit from the encouragement of Jillian Michaels herself—who repeatedly promises to kick your butt and whip you into shape on her website—through her video tutorials and training guides. It’s like having a personal trainer motivate you during your workout, but with a much lower price tag.
I’ve learned a ton about health and fitness – specifically weight loss and motivation – over the past several months. So much so that I’ve recently become a personal trainer so that I could help others reach their health and fitness goals as well. I’m super excited about this new found passion and can’t wait to start helping more people. If you have any questions about this program or any other exercise program please don’t hesitate to ask – I’m here to help.
Christy Brissette, MS, RD is one of North America's top dietitians and a leading nutrition and food communications expert. She is the President of 80 Twenty Nutrition, a nutrition and food media company. Her mission is to end food confusion and dieting once and for all. Christy appears on national TV and is interviewed for international magazines, radio and websites. She empowers her clients to look and feel their best with the healing power of healthy, delicious food. She helps clients achieve results through cutting-edge, creative and fun meal plans and recipes. You can still enjoy your favourite foods and have the body of your dreams!
Lifestyle plays an even bigger role in belly fat — it's essential that you eat right and work to keep stress at bay, he explained. Of course, walking can help with both of these things, but together they're a factor in how much belly fat you're able to burn. "Too many things contribute to say just one thing will make losing belly fat easier," Goelzer said.
So when does a period of weight stability (which is expected) after weight loss become a weight loss plateau? Weight loss plateaus are often a normal, yet frustrating, part of the weight loss process. If you’re stuck in a true weight loss plateau while following a low carb or ketogenic nutritional approach, it might be due to one or more of the reasons outlined below. But first, ask yourself if you’re truly in a weight loss plateau or is this part of a weight stability period, which most people should expect at some point during their weight loss journey. While our differences are a wonderful thing, when it comes to figuring out a stall in your weight loss it can also be a source of frustration as well.
I used the ketogenic diet for several years about 4 years ago. I had various reasons. I have epilepsy, I craved food all the time..even when I was eating “healthy” and the weight wouldn’t budge. I didn’t know as much as I did now and the initial stages were horrible, then boom! Mental clarity and energy kicked in. I became more active and weight loss was no longer an issue. I knew I felt better but didn’t realize just how profound it was until 8 months later. It was Thanksgiving and I still prepared foods my family likes..my pecan pie is greatly anticipated, lol. I decided that..heck..it was my birthday too and I was going to have a slice of that pie! Almost immediately afterwards I felt bad. I tried to read the newspaper and literally could not make out many words and what I did read wasn’t very comprehensive. I later crashed, slept, and waited for the sugar to get burned. That memory has always stuck with me. After a few years, I had health complications due to seizures because of a generic version of my meds wasn’t being absorbed and I had many injuries. 3 surgeries..cervical spinal fusion from 2 blown discs, a rotator cuff repair, and because the more seizures you have, the more you’re apt to have, I had a VNS implant. Needless to say, probably when I needed the diet the most, I started to slip. I relied heavily on the help of others. I still kept eating wheat or sugar to a minimum but my macros were out of whack. I was actually eating too much protein. I suffered bowel issues chronically. :/ Here I am now..I’ve healed a great deal. I didn’t seem to loose a lot of muscle mass but the adipose definitely had put me out of wearing my jeans, I was depressed and unmotivated. About 3 months ago, I found my willpower and stepped back into the gym. I work with a trainer who had designed a macro layout for me to try. It was high protein, modest carbs..and lower even in fat. I didn’t feel terrible on the diet but I knew it wasn’t the best for me. I weightlift and was throwing in a little cardio. I was at 150g protein, 85g carbs, 45g fat. I didn’t have the energy to do the cardio. I suffered very slow muscle recovery after lifting. Every month we check progress but very little was made. In 3 months I had only lost 2lbs but gained .5lbs of muscle but I knew I needed to reassess the plan. I had also started to have carb noticeable cravings which escalated over time. I was feeling worse over time rather than invigorated by exercise. I crashed and said enough! This week I took off from the gym to rework my diet and regimen. I have gone back to the ketogenic way of life. I learned how to minimize the keto flu..electrolytes! And hydration. I’m on day 3. My energy is returning and mental clarity is better. I’ve decided to reduce my workout load..which was fairly intense. I’ve paid attention to ensure my fat intake is higher..I’m still hovering between 30-50 grams of carbs but will tweak it out. I use digestive enzyme supplements, b-vitamins, vitamin c, CQ 10, and electrolytes..to name a few. My medications can deplete certain nutrients,my adrenals are possibly taxed and I am trying to support energy levels. I’m staying active but in a more gentle way until the ground is more level. I think getting back into keto adaptation will be a bit easier as my body has done this before and we have muscle memory. I have a general idea of where I performed best physically with certain carb grams..around 50-60 with intense exercise is fine and I make good progress with plenty of energy. For now, I’m jump starting fat burning though so I’m trying to go even lower. It’s a bit tedious micromanaging macros and calories. I tend to not eat enough and my protein will override. I have no clue how much fat and protein I should generally consume as calories from fat are dense I’ve calculated I will need less fat grams than protein but that doesn’t sound right. Thanks for reading and any tips on those macros are welcome!
Just like your brain has pain sensors to tell you that the curling iron is hot, your brain has hunger sensors. Basically your brain is telling your stomach “we need nourishment” or in the case of the curling iron “hey, woman that’s hot stop touching it”. The only way to turn off hunger receptors is to feed your body the nourishment it needs to sustain itself… and yep you guessed it that means veggies! (7,8)
Perhaps you might be consuming too much fat because you’re trying to raise your ketones, but pump the brakes! In addition to potentially contributing too many calories, sources of fat like coconut oil (including concentrated supplements) contain medium chain triglycerides (MCT). These cannot be stored in body fat, meaning that whatever is consumed has to be promptly burned for energy. So you’re adding these sources on top of your dietary fat consumption for satiety, this type of fat takes priority. Often times people fall into the trap of adding supplements of coconut oil or straight up MCT oil and it ends up adding extra calories. Yes, it may raise your ketones a bit, but the overall cost may impact your weight loss.
I kept my blood sugar from spiking by following a fat loss program built for me. It was quite similar to the slow carb diet. The methods I used were from the advice I found from a variety of locations, surrounding foods and how diet alone can make for some amazing weight loss. You can get the program we used for this right here: women click here – and – men click here.
Testing your limits brings about than just bragging rights. Lifting a heavier weight for fewer reps burns nearly twice as many calories during the two hours after your workout than lifting a lighter weight for more reps, according to research published in the journal Medicine & Science in Sports & Exercise. Feel smug in the knowledge you’re still torching calories in that 10am meeting.
Full Plate Living is a nonprofit dedicated to a simple mission: Encourage, educate, support, and inspire anyone who wants to live a healthier lifestyle. They don’t advocate for starving yourself, spending your life at the gym, or giving up the foods you love. They’re also not about fad diets or weight loss supplements. Instead, they offer practical, straightforward steps to maintain a healthy lifestyle. Visit the blog.
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